Dallas Business Consultant Elijah ClarkDallas Business Consultant Elijah Clark

Online Marketing Success

Content Marketing

Whether you’re a local business, an ecommerce site, or a nationwide franchise, your website goal(s) is what defines content purpose. Most of all, your website should be enjoyed by the consumer and tour guide visitors through a funnel to reach your website goal.

Keyword Copy Storylines

Content storylines need to answer a site visitor’s reason for pulling your website. It’s not convincing the visitor that they need your help by creating letters and words; instead, your words along with images narrate for visitors and convince them that your product/service will temper their hurdles so to purchase.

With that being said, many websites fail to have an objective. Keyword copy is then created for the sake of SEO, and disconnection of reality occurs on the premise that it leads to money. This belief though is only true when a website has a defined goal, and Web content storytelling is created for formal marketing strategies. For this reason, building brand awareness without a goal, while lacking marketing strategy, is a recipe unmindful of how to market a brand on the Web.

Buy Me Website Design

Serious Web businesses demand and press into service methodical online marketing strategies. Target audiences are analyzed, segmented, and character cross-sectioned. The result is a website with content that:

  1. Connects with
  2. Bewitches,
  3. Embraces,
  4. Influences, and
  5. Herds wanted goal action(s).

This course leaves no generic storyline driveways, and keeps your content focus revolving around your marketing strategies.

Consumer Leads

Marketers From Mars exposed that consumers’ love content storytelling and want it through:


This means that content has to be tweaked for each cross-sectioned audience silo. In other words, getting the copy storyline right depends on where and how the consumer encounters your brand within their unique shopping cycle.

What does this means for Web based businesses? Your brand’s storyline is keyword scripted, optimized as well as distributed for a consumer’s unique shopping cycle to accomplish your website’s purpose.

A phenomenology research method

Based on my research of a phenomenology, it uses descriptive analysis to capture experiences (Sanders, 1982). The method evaluates experiences and brings them closer to lived phenomena (Sanders, 1982). A phenomenology study is a method used for unfolding human experience by examining the uniqueness and commonalities of events and circumstances. A phenomenology approach is recommended for continually evaluating biases and presuppositions (Sanders, 1982). A phenomenology study focuses on understanding the meaning of human experiences by analyzing the pure and unencumbered visions of experiences. A phenomenology research design comprises of three components, which are a) determining limits of who and what is to investigate, b) data collection, and c) phenomenology analysis of data (Sanders, 1982). The data collection techniques used in phenomenology research include in-depth, documentary, and observation. Additionally, it is essential that interviews conducted are recorded and transcribed.

Additional Reading

Sanders, P. (1982). Phenomenology: A new way of viewing organizational research. Academy Of Management Review, 7(3), 353-360. doi:10.5465/AMR.1982.4285315

Qualitative research methods

Qualitative research methods work to understand and discover experiences, perspectives, and insight of participants (Hiatt, 1986). An advantage of a qualitative approach is that study participants are not constrained to a predetermined set of responses (Harwell, 2011). A downfall of the study in regards to collecting data is that it is expensive considering the amount of time needed to collect the data. Qualitative research consists of using lived experiences and interpreting the phenomena (Denzin & Lincoln, 2005).

Quantitative research methods focus on increasing objectivity and typically interested in future prediction (Harwell, 2011). Features of quantitative research include instruments used for collecting data, which often include test, reliance, probability theory, and surveys for analyzing statistical hypothesis that relate to research questions. Quantitative methods are considered deductive in nature considering collected data create general inferences about the characteristics of a population (Harwell, 2011). A quantitative method often makes assumptions that there is only a single truth that exist, which does not include human perception (Lincoln & Guba, 1985). A quantitative approach is beneficial for gathering information. The problem with this approach is that it does not cover the reason for why certain data concluded in a certain manner.

Mixed methods combine qualitative and quantitative methods by linking their differences while addresses a research question (Harwell, 2011). The key principle of mixed methods is that various forms of data should be collected by using multiple strategies and methods. The methods should assist with reflecting complementary strengths and weaknesses that do not overlap. The mixed methods study should create insight that is not possible with only a qualitative or quantitative approach. Mixed methods produce opportunities for approaches with weaknesses and presents opportunities by correcting method biases (Harwell, 2011). Mixed methods approach uses balance for efficiently collecting data. The concern with using a mixed methods approach is that the method struggles to complement, and not duplicate each approach (Harwell, 2011).

Research study methodologies are characterized as either qualitative, quantitative, or a combination of both, which is referred to as mixed methods. Of the methods, neither can be considered the best method without factoring the goals and objectives of the research. Research that desires to focus on interviewing lived experiences of participants should use a qualitative approach (Harwell, 2011). In contrast, a mixed methods approach should be used for research that needs a combination of qualitative and quantitate approaches to justify the goals and objectives.

 

Additional Resources

Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2005). Introduction. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of qualitative research (3rd ed., pp. 1–29). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. doi:10.1108/09504120610655394

Hiatt, J. F. (1986). Spirituality, medicine, and healing. Southern Medical Journal, 79, 736–743. doi:10.1097/00007611-198606000-00022

Harwell, M. R. (2011). Research design in qualitative/quantitative/mixed methods. The Sage handbook for research in education. 2nd ed. Los Angeles, CA: Sage, 147. doi:10.4135/9781483351377.n11

Lincoln, Y. S., & Guba, E. G. (1985). Naturalistic inquiry. Newbury Park, CA: Sage. doi:10.1177/144078338702300329

Work Productivity

Performance is dependent upon satisfaction toward the party most benefitted. Additionally, the ethics of the organization and its leadership have a tremendous affect on the morale of the employee. If morale is down, then work productivity may also slack. According to a research by Chekwa, Ouhirra, Thomas, and Chukwuanu (2014), 75% of employees have no desire to work for a company with poor organizational ethics. Additionally, research has discovered that leaders are responsible for creating healthy environments by supporting  employees (Avolio, Walumbwa, & Weber, 2009). Leadership is crucial when developing productive employees and influencing employee morale and satisfaction. To implement and maintain morale, leaders should place importance on stress prevention programs and develop effective communication methods with employees to discover and address issues regarding dissatisfaction and ethical dilemmas (Chekwa et al., 2014). Additionally, research has discovered that leaders are responsible for creating healthy environments by supporting  employees (Avolio, Walumbwa, & Weber, 2009).

 

Additional Readings

Avolio, B. J., Walumbwa, F. O., & Weber, T. J. (2009). Leadership: current theories, research, and future directions. Annual Review of Psychology, 60, 421–449. doi:10.1177/0149206310393520

Chekwa, C., Ouhirra, L., Thomas, E., & Chukwuanu, M. (2014). An examination of the effects of leadership on business ethics: Empirical study. International Journal Of Business & Public Administration, 11(1), 48-65.

Mentzer, J. T., Myers, M. B., & Stank, T. P. (Eds.). (2007). Handbook of global supply chain management. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

READY TO GROW YOUR SMALL BUSINESS ONLINE?
Click for Book Offer