Dallas Business Consultant Elijah ClarkDallas Business Consultant Elijah Clark

Qualitative or Quantitative

Determining whether to use a qualitative or quantitative method is really dependent upon how you desire to collect your data and what is important to you. A qualitative examination technique assesses why people behave a certain way. Furthermore, the strategy aides in discovering boundaries that influence thinking by breaking down points of interest and gathering information from in-depth sources (Šalkovska & Ogsta, 2014). A qualitative examination produces findings that are regularly not conclusive and are exploratory in nature. The advantage of this kind of study is that it gives alternative research to further decision making. A quantitative methodology utilizes information in view of raw information and statistics. The research technique frequently uses experiments and segments to gather information (Šalkovska & Ogsta, 2014).  A quantitative methodology is similar to qualitative concerning the examining of individual practices. However, a quantitative methodology uses structured information to shape a hypothesis and conclusion (Šalkovska & Ogsta, 2014). Unlike quantitative, a qualitative examination is non-measurable. Furthermore, a quantitative exploration produces detailed information that contribute to in-depth comprehension, while a quantitative examination produces information based on populace and generalized information.

Additional Readings

Šalkovska, J., & Ogsta, E. (2014). Quantitative and qualitative measurement methods of companies’ marketing efficiency. Management Of Organizations: Systematic Research, (70), 91-105. doi:10.7220/MOSR.1392-1142.2014.70.7

Helpful Writing and Research Tools

Google Scholar Walden Search
Google Scholar is a great tool for finding scholarly resources about various subjects. The service allows users to search topics and discover digital articles and libraries that provide the article for either free or paid through preprint and reprint servers (Jacsó, 2005). Google Scholar also offers advance services that allow for users to filter search results based on their institution. If you would like to search articles specific to University, you could set this filter up from the Google Scholar home page. To do this, you need to click on the settings link at the top and then under the library links, type in the schools name. The next time that you search Google Scholar and if the source in within the school’s Library, Google Scholar will provide a direct link to that article by showing a “Find in School” link on the right of found articles.

Reference Indent
An additional trick that I have learned to use is with the reference section to get the reference indent required in APA. The trick is to highlight the entire reference in Microsoft Word and then click the buttons Control and T simultaneously. For Mac users, the buttons are Command and T.

DOI search
The next helpful tool that I use is crossref for getting citation DOI’s. However, instead of having to search and use filters, you can simply bookmark this link to go right to the box where you can input the reference: http://search.crossref.org/references.

Note Taking
Another tool that I often like to use is an online annotator called Diigo. This tool allows you to search the web, highlight text, and paste sticky notes all throughout a website. Once you have done this, you can easily go to Diigo.com, login, and find all of your notes in addition to categorize and export them. This tool is great for keeping track of articles, referencing websites, annual reports, and organizing content.

 

Additional Readings

Jacsó, P. (2005). Google Scholar: the pros and the cons. Online information review, 29(2), 208-214. doi:10.1108/14684520510598066

Security Breach and Ethics

As a healthcare patient, I feel that the privacy of my personal information is a major concern. Organizations should focus on making ethical decisions when handling patient information in regards to implementing effective security and privacy measures (Haag & Cummings, 2008). Many organizations including healthcare spend thousands or millions of dollars on securing patient privacy and protecting data against breaches and hackers (Farahmand, Navathe, Sharp, & Enslow, 2005). It is the responsibility of leaders and management to understand and influence ethical practices which relate to privacy and security threats (Haag & Cummings, 2008). Security breaches have the ability to disable the functions of a business and pilfer confidential consumer information such as healthcare information, social security numbers, and passwords (Tran & Atkinson, 2002). In addition to potential loss in revenue, breaches also create consumer distrust, and negatively affect brand reputation (Farahmand et al., 2005).  The risks associated with breaches such as loss of confidentiality, integrity, and availability, should cause organizations to be aware and active with threats that generate concerns (Halliday, Badenhorst, & Solms, 1996).

 

Suggested Readings

Farahmand, F., Navathe, S. B., Sharp, G. P., & Enslow, P. H. (2005). A management perspective on risk of security threats to information systems. Information Technology and Management, 6(2–3). doi:10.1007/s10799-005-5880-5

Haag, S., & Cummings, M. (2008). Management information systems for the information age (Laureate Education, Inc., custom ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Halliday, S., Badenhorst, K., & Solms, R. (1996). A business approach to effective information technology risk analysis and management. Information Management & Computer Security, 4(1). doi:10.1108/09685229610114178

Tran, E., & Atkinson, M. (2002). Security of personal data across national borders. Information Management & Computer Security, 10(5). doi:10.1108/09685220210446588

What is an RFID?

In regards to global logistics, technology including radio-frequency identification (RFID ) assume a critical part in developing harmony in understanding overstocking and understocking expenses for organizations. The technology allows for organizations to better forecast product demand in the business sector (Pokharel, 2005).  Additionally, RFID’s are used to assist organizations with accomplishing stock level and expense goals by providing information used to help manage and implement logistics. RFID innovation is currently used in organizations such as Wal-Mart to assist in tracking products and provide real-time data to prevent counterfeiting and to monitor stock levels(Pokharel, 2005). RFID technology is equally important for privacy rights of individuals and global logistics. However, RFID plays a more common role in logistics than for individuals. The ability to track and monitor products by utilizing RFID technology has been proven effective and continues to be a reliable resource for many organizations.

 

Suggested Reading

Pokharel, S. (2005). Perception on information and communication technology perspectives in logistics: A study of transportation and warehouses sectors in Singapore. Journal of Enterprise Information Management, 18(1/2). doi:10.1108/17410390510579882

Privacy and Ethical Concerns

Ethical considerations within businesses are largely over-looked within marketing management research (Bell & Bryman, 2007). Business ethics research inherently focuses on sensitive and controversial issues (Miyazaki & Taylor, 2008). Consequently, most business ethics research is susceptible to interaction biases (Miyazaki & Taylor, 2008).

There is a growing concern from consumers that their privacy and personal information is being digitized and sold without their permission (Foxman & Kilcoyne, 1993). The concern is that credit cards, billing details, and other private data is bought and sold across the marketing industry between businesses and organizations to use as soliciting tools. Consumers agree that the lack of organizational ethics when collecting the information is morally wrong (Foxman & Kilcoyne, 1993). The debate amongst consumers and businesses is that both parties feel they own the information submitted. Businesses believe that they have the right to use the information any way they choose to help better their organizational goals and to produce better marketing services (Foxman & Kilcoyne, 1993). Additionally, the organizations that purchase the user information feel they own the data because they purchased it.

If the results show that a company is being unethical by confusing or misinforming consumers on how their private information is used, management should work diligently to resolve the confusion by making privacy details clear. In formulating a research-oriented approach that would benefit the practice in regards to the issue presented, I recommend utilizing a qualitative format similar to the constructivist format. I would begin by outlining the problems being addressed and then focus on presenting existing literature regarding the problem and the significance of the study (Creswell, 2009). Next, I would present procedures including a qualitative research strategy for collecting the necessary data. Finally, I would focus on validating my finding using various forms of interview questions, observational forms, timelines, and proposed budgets (Creswell, 2009).

Recommended Readings

Bell, E., & Bryman, A. (2007). The ethics of management research: An exploratory content analysis. British Journal of Management, 18(1), 63–77. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8551.2006.00487.x

Creswell, J. W. (2009). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches (Laureate Education, Inc., custom ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Foxman, E. R., & Kilcoyne, P. (1993). Information technology, marketing practice, and consumer privacy: Ethical issues. Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, 12(1), 106-119. doi: 10.1007/s10660-007-9000-y

Miyazaki , A. D., & Taylor, K. A. (2008). Researcher interaction biases and business ethics research: Respondent reactions to researcher characteristics. Journal of Business Ethics, 81(4), 779–795. doi:10.1007/s10551-007-9547-5

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