Dallas Business Consultant Elijah ClarkDallas Business Consultant Elijah Clark

Newsletter/e-marketing technique

Coming up with a newsletter/e-marketing technique depends on your website. If the website is an informative website, members will signup to receive information or articles. If it’s a service based website or a website that sells products, users will sign up to receive product specials and new products coming. If it’s an employment opportunity website, members will signup to get updates on new employment opportunities. Current customers can use these forms to signup for newsletters that offer discounts and specials that may be going on within your company.

The reason that customers and potential customers will sign up is because they will want to know about the upcoming specials. Customers may want to be informed of a discounted products or services that they couldn’t previously afford or didn’t want to pay the high funds for. During the sign up for the newsletter, your company should ask customers what they are interested in receiving newsletters on.

Strategy Contents

Contents

Table of contents so that investors can quickly find the information they are looking for.

Introduction

[Background]
[Summary of financial needs]

Executive Summary

[Company information]
[Market opportunity]

Benefits to the Community

Economic Development
[Describe jobs created by the business]
[How will purchases for the business help other local businesses?]
[Any additional information]

Community Development
[How will the company’s goods/services help the community?]
[Any additional information]

Human Development
[How will the business help its employees?]
[Any additional information]

Company Analysis

Form of Business Ownership
[Will your business be a sole proprietorship, partnership, or corporation? Why?]
[Describe any necessary licenses or permits and your plans for obtaining them.]
[Will yours be an independent business, a takeover of an existing business, an expansion of an existing business, or a franchise?]
[Any additional information]

About the Company
[If you are taking over or expanding an existing business, describe any relevant history.]
[How will the business satisfy customer needs?]
[How did you choose and develop the company’s products/services, and how are they unique?]
[Any additional information]

Industry Analysis

[In what industry does the business operate?]
[Who are the competitors?]
[Have any other businesses recently entered or exited the industry?]
[How will the business be profitable, and what are the growth opportunities?]
[Describe any e-business opportunities.]
[Any additional information]

Management Team

[Who are the key members of the business team?]
[How will the company be structured?]
[How is the team balanced in terms of skills?]
[What is the company’s management philosophy and culture? What is your leadership style?]
[Describe the key management positions and compensation for those positions.]
[What other professionals will assist the management team?]
[Any additional information]

Manufacturing and Operations Plan

Location and Space Requirements
[Where is the planned location?]
[Discuss the location’s proximity to customers and suppliers.]
[Discuss tax rates and zoning requirements for the location.]
[Discuss transportation issues.]
[Discuss utility costs.]
[Will you rent, lease, or purchase the facility?]
[Any additional information]

Equipment
[Will you rent or purchase equipment?]
[Any additional information]

Labor Force

[Discuss the local labor pool. Is there a sufficient quantity of skilled people to meet the business’s needs?]
[Discuss wage rates and unionization issues.]
[Any additional information]

Inventory Control
[How will you control quality, inventory, and production?]
[Any additional information]

Purchasing Requirements
[Will you make or purchase component parts to be assembled into the finished product?]
[Any additional information]
Subcontractors and Suppliers
[Who are your potential subcontractors and suppliers?]
[Any additional information]

Labor Force

Labor Requirements
[How many employees are needed? Full time or part time?]
[What are the job qualifications?]
[Will you have written job descriptions?]
[What will you pay your employees? How does that compare with the going rate in your region and industry?]
[Any additional information]

Selection, Orientation, and Training
[Do you have a job application form?]
[What criteria will you use in selecting employees?]
[What orientation process will there be for new employees?]
[How will new employees be trained?]
[Any additional information]

Evaluation, Policies, and Rules
[How will employees be evaluated?]
[Will authority be delegated to employees?]
[How will you discipline employees?]
[What will you do when employees resign?]
[Any additional information]

Marketing Plan

Target Market(s)
[What is/are your target market(s) and what common needs can the business satisfy?]
[What are the current needs of each target market? Describe the target market in terms of demographic, geographic, psychographic, and product usage characteristics.]
[What changes in the target market are anticipated?]
[What advantages and disadvantages do you have in meeting the target market’s needs?]
[What are the relevant aspects of consumer behavior and product use?]
[Any additional information]

Environment
[What are the competitive, legal, political, economic, technological, and sociocultural factors affecting your marketing efforts?]
[Any additional information]

Marketing Objectives
[Describe your product introduction, improvement, or innovation]
[State the market size in dollars and units. Indicate your primary and secondary sources of data and the methods used to estimate total market size and your market share.]
[Describe your distribution plans.]
[Describe your pricing objectives.]
[Describe your advertising and promotion efforts.]
[How will the results of your marketing plan be measured and evaluated?]
[Any additional information]

Financial Plan

Startup and Operating Needs
[How much money do you have, and what is the actual amount of money you need to open your business (start-up budget)?]
[How much money is needed to keep the business open (operating budget)? Prepare a realistic budget.]
[What sources of funding do you anticipate?]
[Any additional information]

Financial Statements
[Prepare an income statement by month for the first year of operation and by quarter for the second and third years.]
[Prepare balance sheets for each of the first three years of operation.]
[Any additional information]

Financial Analysis
[Prepare a breakeven analysis. How many units of your products or service will have to be sold to cover your costs?]
[Reinforce your final projections by comparing them with industry averages for your chosen industry.]
[Any additional information]

Exit Strategy

[How do you plan to get yourself (and your money) out of the business?]
[Do you intend to grow the business to the point of an IPO?]
[Do you intend to sell the business?]
[How will investors get their money back?]
[Any additional information]

Critical Risks and Assumptions

[What will you do if your market develops either more slowly or more quickly than anticipated?]
[How will you react to competitor challenges such as underpricing or new products that make yours obsolete?]
[How will you react to favorable or unfavorable changes in the industry?]
[How will you react if there is a labor shortage or other labor-related issue?]
[How will you react if there is an erratic supply of products or raw materials?]
[Any additional information]

Appendix

Google Ad – A/B testing

Most people who do A/B testing are never truly giving their testing ad a full chance at achieving its best possible results. Furthermore, without testing the ad properly, these individuals or companies may ultimately lose money, time and potentially reject a successful ad that just never had the chance to prove itself successful due to the lack of owner knowledge.

In addition to the explanation of failed ads, Thies goes further into his article and explains the process of creating a successful ad testingcampaign. The technique he uses explains that by keeping the control ad running throughout the testing of the new ad, the user can save money and also “eliminate performance history as a variable (Thies, 2008)” in the test ad. By creating multiple copies of the control ad, the user can “avoid giving 50% of impressions to an unproven ad which may fail (Thies, 2008).”

Creating multiple copies of the control ad, the user does not lose as much profit due to the control ad always running. Instead of the user losing 50% of ad impressions to the testing ad, that percentage shrinks to 20% because of the additional control ad copies.

In addition to this type of testing saving profits and potentially accelerating the testing process, it also allows for the user to create a valid testing environment by “comparing the performance of the test ad against the copies of the control only (Thies, 2008).”

Credits

Thies, D. (2008). Split testing adwords: you’re doing it wrong. Retrieved June 12, 2010, from http://www.seofaststart.com/blog/split-testing-adwords-youre-doing-it-wrong

Selling the Vision

A vision is common in most major leadership theories and it can be defined as an end-state or description of the future (Ilies, Judge, & Wagner, 2006). Visions are generally focused on building innovation and creating change (Ilies, Judge, & Wagner, 2006; James, & Lahti, 2011). Visions are considered to represent idealized future states of what is desired and not what currently is (James, & Lahti, 2011). A vision is said to represent shared values and can often have an ethical overtone (Ilies, Judge, & Wagner, 2006; James, & Lahti, 2011). An effective vision is based on organizational purpose (Mayfield, Mayfield, & Sharbrough, 2015). All visions must incorporate a goal, and many consider a vision paramount to strategies and processes (Ilies, Judge, & Wagner, 2006). An organizational vision is defined as an ideological goal that organizations, members, and leaders are morally satisfied in pursuing (James, & Lahti, 2011). A vision should translate the organizations strategies, which can then be translated into achievable goals (James, & Lahti, 2011).

Leaders with compelling visions can provide a sense of purpose and meaning to followers (James, & Lahti, 2011). A leaders’ vision can effect the goals of an organization, considering it has an effect on the direction of action, intensity of effort, and effort persistency (Mayfield, Mayfield, & Sharbrough, 2015). Leaders often use visions to motivate and persuade followers to pursue tasks goals with passion (James, & Lahti, 2011). Effective leaders with visions have been shown to significantly have an impact on followers’ creativity, inspiration, achievement, team innovation, and organizational performance (James, & Lahti, 2011; Mayfield, Mayfield, & Sharbrough, 2015). Furthermore, vision inspiration can promote positive organizational outcomes, change, and performance (James, & Lahti, 2011). Transformational leaders particularly may be best for motivating and appealing to followers’ common ideals and ethical values (Ilies, Judge, & Wagner, 2006). Transformational leaders may use emotional aspects and gestures to communicate their vision and build commitment (Ilies, Judge, & Wagner, 2006). Leaders can better achieve visions by engaging followers and creating a shared organizational vision with followers (Mayfield, Mayfield, & Sharbrough, 2015). Leaders can promote organizations change through articulating a clear vision and promoting a strong relationship between followers that influences them to accept the vision (Ilies, Judge, & Wagner, 2006; James, & Lahti, 2011; Mayfield, Mayfield, & Sharbrough, 2015).

Visions should be well communicated by leaders and are more likely to be consensually shared by leaders and followers when social exchange and agreement occurs (Mayfield, Mayfield, & Sharbrough, 2015). It is not enough for a leader to simply have a vision, they must also know how to bring the vision into fruition (Ilies, Judge, & Wagner, 2006; Mayfield, Mayfield, & Sharbrough, 2015). It is the leaders responsibility to provide followers with a road map to achieve goals that will fulfill visions. This can be done by motivation and creating challenging goals (Ilies, Judge, & Wagner, 2006).

 

Credits

Ilies, R., Judge, T., & Wagner, D. (2006). Making Sense of Motivational Leadership: The Trail from Transformational Leaders to Motivated Followers. Journal Of Leadership & Organizational Studies (Baker College), 13(1), 1-22. doi: 10.1177/10717919070130010301

James, K., & Lahti, K. (2011). Organizational Vision and System Influences on Employee Inspiration and Organizational Performance. Creativity & Innovation Management, 20(2), 108-120. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8691.2011.00595.x

Mayfield, J., Mayfield, M., & Sharbrough, W. C. (2015). Strategic Vision and Values in Top Leaders’ Communications: Motivating Language at a Higher Level. Journal Of Business Communication, 52(1), 97-121. doi:10.1177/2329488414560282

Evolving Consumer Behavior – Case Study

CompanyEC’s (CEC) current marketing plan is not currently aimed at engaging the online consumer behaviors identified in the Meet the Connected Consumer study. The reason for this is not that CEC finds these studies irrelevant. It’s due to CEC simply not having the strongest of marketing plans. Currently, the marketing plan is to create backlinks mainly within forums and blogs within its niche market. Nonetheless, CEC does have its company brand within the most popular of search engines and social networking websites. What CEC could do to improve its marketing for this study is to place more ad dollars and marketing within the areas mentioned. A majority of CEC’ consumers have a MySpace, Facebook and Twitter account. With that knowledge, CEC could benefit greatly from advertising within these markets.

Being that CEC is an online-based company, using this consumer study for its marketing techniques could allow for the company to gain a true understanding of its online consumers. CEC could easily implement most of the web 2.0 techniques into its own company. Previously, the tag cloud technique was used on the main page of the website. However, this was removed due to room for further marketing. In addition, RSS feeds and social bookmarking tools are currently implemented within the website.

While this consumer study can be beneficial to use for marketing, it would also seem to be most affective with a dedicated team member to handle this portion of the marketing on a regular basis. This type of marketing needs to be kept and updated regularly, possibly on a daily and/or hourly basis. Assigning the task of keeping these techniques updated will be the best method to create its success. In addition to marketing, creating online contest and awards can also encourage user interactivity within the social networks (Welborn, 2009).

The Internet and customer behavior

The Internet isn’t changing the way that CEC’ customers behave mainly because the business has always been an Internet business. The only difference is the locations in which CEC is marketing itself. It has previously been marketed within locations such as Craigslist.org, Backpage.com, Yellowbook.com, and other local advertising websites. With the internet changing and advancing with user interacted web 2.0 websites, the business now has the opportunity of being marketed on broader networks such as Facebook, Twitter, MySpace and LinkedIn. In the order to create success within the web 2.0 market place, CEC needs to join this social online environment and make its brand positively known (Eikelmann, Hajj, Peterson, 2007).

With the thousands of additional social networking, blogs and forum type websites, CEC has a greater opportunity to build its brand name. Searching for the keyword “CompanyEC” on search engines will bring up a large list of the websites links and name within other websites. Currently, CEC has as many as 120k backlinks.

What the development of new websites and the growth in online networking, the Internet has been created as the largest marketing tool for CEC. This is done through a combination of CEC’ own online marketing and through previous customers promoting the brand online through their social networks. This allows for CEC to be found through many new, relevant and trusted sources on the Internet.

There hasn’t been any noticeable difference in how the users view the website or company or any changes within their decision-making process. Visitors are still looking to visit the website and find what they are looking for quickly with as little amount of clicks as possible.

Shifting behavioral patterns

CEC’ current marketing efforts are capitalizing on the shifting behaviors of its target audience. Ways in which is does this is through social networking websites, forums and blogs. With each of these online networks growing in users and in popularity, CEC has found many opportunities in joining these networks to build its brand name.

In addition to CEC’ own marketing techniques, potential and past consumers are also discussing the services offered through the company. While searching through the Internet for the company’s name, it has showed up on many additional forums and blogs through users own discussion postings. CEC has found that the company name in these situations is being used as references from previous customers or questions from potential customers. With seeing the affects of this type of marketing, CEC has placed high priority on customer satisfaction, as the users experience is likely to be shared throughout the Internet.

Brand evangelists

CEC has some great opportunities to create and identify brand awareness. The ways in which it creates them is by providing them a valuable service and simply ask them to tell their friends. A happy customer is very likely to tell their friends of the service they received from CEC. Creating brand evangelists doesn’t necessarily involve rewarding the customer with free services. The best method that has been proven successful is by letting the customer know that they are appreciated as a customer and advise them to please tell their friends of the service they have received from the company.

Previous customers are also likely to socialize about the service they received form the company without being asked. If they are happy, they will likely tell everyone why they are. Whether a Facebook, Twitter or MySpace status update, blogs or forums, they will tell their story of success. Customer satisfaction goes a long way when creating brand evangelists.

Ways in which CEC can identify brand evangelist is firstly by joining and staying updated with its social networks and watch for when the company name is mentioned. Another method is by understanding the type of user that the service is being created for. If CEC is creating a website for a consumer that is socially active, then it needs to place a higher priority into making sure that they are satisfied with their service. These users are likely to express their service online and their users are likely to take the advice as coming from a relevant and trusted source. Users with large social networks are a great opportunity for CEC to create brand evangelist.

Another great opportunity for CEC to get involved with its consumers online is by incorporating widgets into the company website. These widgets can be used to allow for CEC’ site visitors to communicate their thoughts and share them on their favorite social networking websites with the click of a button.

 

Credits

Eikelmann, S., Hajj, J., Peterson, M. (2007). Web 2.0: profiting from the threat. Retrieved May 21, 2010, from http://www.strategy-business.com/article/li00037

Schmitt, G. (n.d.). Meet the connected consumer. Retrieved May 21, 2010, from http://www.slideshare.net/gschmitt/meet-the-connected-consumer

Welborn, J. (2009). The eight essential steps for successful social media marketing. Retrieved May 22, 2010, from http://www.indelibuzz.com/?p=362

Company Online Pressroom

In planning a pressroom section, there are many different elements that we would be sure to include. Those elements consist of:

Company Background Info

This section will be included to give the background information on the company. This will include information on how the company was started, the mission of the company and the company’s work ethics and beliefs. This section would be great for building user confidence and comfort in the company.

Executive biographies

The biography section will include information on each of the company’s CEO’s and top leaders in each department. The purpose of this section is to help and build a relationship with the site users by providing the site with a humanistic feel and allowing the users to get to know the writers and executives.

Contact Info

The contact information will allow for users to be able to contact the company if they have questions or comments to articles, blogs or other personal input on the company or website.

Latest News/In the news

This section will include the latest information on the company’s success and changes. This will be used to keep users updated on what is going on within the company.

Multi-media content

This will allow for the company to post multimedia videos of conferences, events or other valuable content that can help or update the users on the industry and the company.

RSS feeds and social media links

Users who wish to stay updated with the company will use these tools. This is another way for users to stay updated and ask question or leave comments.

Search capability

While this tool is not always needed, it would be great to have on the site once we gain more content within the press release section. This allows for users to easily find information on what they are looking for within the site.

Calendar of Events

This section will keep users updated on what the company is doing, when they are doing it and where it is taking place. This is yet another avenue for users to use in order to follow the company. This could also be used as a way to invite users to events that the company may be attending.

There are other additional elements to use within a press release website, however, these tools and functions are what I deem most important based on what services our company offers and the type of business that we run. With all of our business involving direct and/or verbal contact with our customers, these tools and functions will create a great network and option for users to get involved with the company on a more personal level.

Transparency in Organizations

Transparency is defined as the availability of group specific information to those outside of the group (Bushman, Piotroski, and Smith, 2003). Organizational transparency is when the organizations information is produced, gathered, validated, or disseminated to outside participants (Bushman, Piotroski, and Smith, 2003). Transparency can allow for businesses and individuals to get speedier feedback on products and services (Bennis, 2013). Stakeholders have a right to information concerning the company, brand, and potentially stocks. Transparent organizations allow for stakeholders to gain proper insight into the workings and issues that are relevant (Dubbink, Graafland, & Liedekerke, 2008). Transparency is beneficial for companies in that it helps them to distinguish themselves from similar companies by enhancing innovation (Dubbink, Graafland, & Liedekerke, 2008). Being transparent and informing consumers and partners of important business aspects can be seen as an ethical approach (Dubbink, Graafland, & Liedekerke, 2008). For a leader, being transparent creates trust, honesty, accountability, and responsibility (Dubbink, Graafland, & Liedekerke, 2008). Morally, transparency is important considering it can affect personal integrity, attitude, and organizational commitment (Dubbink, Graafland, & Liedekerke, 2008).

An example of a transparent organization is the travel agency, which moved from traditional travel agencies to online digital offerings. As an online organization, prices, reservations, itineraries, suppliers, and competitive disadvantages became transparent and disrupted traditional sales and business (Granados, & Gupta, 2013). With technology and the internet, business transparency is crucial and business leaders need to understand the power in which transparency enables loyal followers (Bennis, 2013; Dubbink, Graafland, & Liedekerke, 2008). Using digital networks as a transparent company generates sales for new and potential consumers who desire unbiased information and offerings from all vendors (Granados, & Gupta, 2013).

Complete transparency, however, has its setbacks. Companies could lose freedom, secrets, and privacy because of this. Being transparent could conflict with leaders’ moral principles (Dubbink, Graafland, & Liedekerke, 2008). If companies are transparent, consumers can gain knowledge and shared information about products that are available (Dubbink, Graafland, & Liedekerke, 2008). Digital transparency also effects competition as businesses can view, compare, and match competitor prices to their advantage (Granados, & Gupta, 2013). Full transparency may distract consumers and stakeholders from focusing on more important items and information (Dubbink, Graafland, & Liedekerke, 2008). If a company desires to become transparent, it should respect the freedom of both stakeholders and individuals (Dubbink, Graafland, & Liedekerke, 2008).

 

Credits

Bennis, W. (2013). Leadership in a digital world: embracing transparency and adaptive capacity. MIS Quarterly, 37(2), 635-636. Retrieved from http://misq.org

Bushman, Robert M. and Piotroski, Joseph D. and Smith, Abbie J., What Determines Corporate Transparency? (April 2003). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=428601 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.428601

Dubbink, W., Graafland, J., & Liedekerke, L. (2008). CSR, Transparency and the Role of Intermediate Organisations. Journal Of Business Ethics, 82(2), 391-406. doi:10.1007/s10551-008-9893-y

Granados, N., & Gupta, A. (2013). Transparency strategy: competing with information in a digital world. MIS Quarterly, 37(2), 637-641. Retrieved from http://misq.org

Earning a Degree Online

What really creates an online environment to work is the ability to have students who are capable to make it work. What makes onlinelearning successful is that the computer is also becoming successful as many more households are able to own a computer at an affordable price, businesses make mandatory use of it and the Internet continues to grow within every community and within every age and sex group.

When I first starting to take online courses five years ago, the structure of the classroom was drastically different. The one school that I attended has transformed three times since then to adjust to the growing popularity.  At first, online classrooms were somewhat like that of an online forum. As the Internet grew and continues to grow, it is becoming more reliable and trustworthy enough to find information that is beneficial in online learning.

Online learning is only successful because of the many things that it is made up of. Without a savvy user, the Internet, affordable computers and their ease of use, and the growing number a great web developers and programmers, Online learning wouldn’t exist is such the mass that it does.

Reasons that many students have turned to online learning range from;

  • Convenience
  • Better school options
  • Affordability of school and software
  • Accredited faculties
  • Effective learning

Being able to earn a degree from a great school from anywhere around the world, is something that many could only dream of before there was online learning. Not only is distant learning effective, but it is also accepted by society. Without that validity, online learning wouldn’t have succeeded as it has.

Social Media Marketing Plan – Case Study

Whether you want to call it social media or Web 2.0, businesses have started joining into one of the fastest growing industries around. A survey by McKinsey & Company shows that nearly 1,700 businesses show that using Web 2.0 technologies have lead to increased conversions, successful marketing strategies, increased communication and the ability to provide better products.

“The most often-reported business benefits of Web 2.0 are a greater ability to share ideas, improved (and faster) access to knowledge experts, and reduced costs of communication, travel, and operations. (Chartier, 2009)”

Social media marketing

social media marketing plan should be aimed at creating an online presence within the micro-blogging networks such as Facebook and Twitter for your company.

By using an online platform such as Twitter and Facebook, it will allow for your company to promote the company name by blogging updates about the company as well as interact with followers and subscribers.

Along with blogging, other benefits of using a social media platform are:

  • Video updating and posting of commercials
  • Photos of events your company may have attended and posting new portfolio pieces
  • Discussion – allowing followers to ask questions directly from these platforms.
  • Link placement – adding back-links to texdesignstudio.com
  • Networking – allows for interacting with current and potential customers.

Facebook stats:

  • More than 350 million active users.
  • 50% of our active users log on to Facebook in any given day.
  • More than 35 million users update their status each day.
  • More than 700,000 local businesses have active Pages on Facebook.
  • Pages have created more than 5.3 billion fans.
  • Average user spends more than 55 minutes per day on Facebook (Facebook, 2010).

Twitter stats:

  • Total audience of roughly 18 million registered users.
  • Users are averaging 27.3 million tweets per day.
  • Annual run rate of 10 billion tweets (Ostrow, 2009).

Along with advertising your company for free using social media platforms, it will also allow for users to interact from their mobile devices.

Facebook and Twitter are also pushed as services that can and should be used through mobile devices. “Twitter users are more likely to use their cell phones to go online than the overall online population (Cheng, 2006).”

There are currently more than 65 million active users accessing Facebook through their mobile devices.

Knowing this will allow your company to further market to these users on their mobile devices as well as these social platforms. These users are also more likely to subscribe to syndicated feeds and text message advertising.

Our Audience:

Example: CompanyEC currently has a target audience of 18 years of age and above, and college graduates that have an income of $30k or above.

Quantcast user statistics:

Twitter:

  • 88% of Twitter users are 18 years and above in age.
  • 80% have a $30k and above income.
  • 55% are college graduates.

Facebook:

  • 79% of Facebook users are 18 years and above in age.
  • 84% have a $30k and above income.
  • 55% are college graduates.

Understanding the Audience

In order to better understand user response to this new marketing plan, we will provide users with a survey on texdesignstudio.com, which will ask questions regarding how and if they use these platforms.

  • Are they are interested in receiving news and discount updates from CompanyEC on these social platforms.
  • Do they currently follow CompanyEC on these platforms?

Twitter and Facebook currently make it simple for users to follow or become fans of users. If we add a “become a friend” widget on texdesignstudio.com, users can simply click on the widget and will instantly become a fan of CompanyEC’s facebook profile.

By adding a “follow us on Twitter” widget, users can click that widget and instantly start following CompanyEC with their Twitter profiles.

These platforms are relatively easy for any user to sign up with and start receiving updates within a few minutes. Users can link to CompanyEC’s profile and share with their friends on their own profiles.

CompanyEC will use these platforms to provide customers with article updates, blogs, discounts, and portfolio updates.

User Participation

Users will interact by contributing to articles and responding to blogs and other news and images that CompanyEC post within these platforms.

Marketing on these social platforms will allow CompanyEC to post information on corporate accomplishments and distribution of links that take users to corporate websites, promotional sites and other press release pages.

Social media user benefits:

  • Offer ‘insider’ discounts, specials and other values to followers only.
  • Participating in online social media groups will allow for CompanyEC to build a more personal relationship with past and potential customers.
  • Allows for quick access for customers to ask questions.

Being that texdesignstudio.com is written using a Joomla platform, we will be able to integrate it with Facebook and Twitter with little effort. By creating and adding a plug-in into this website, the content on these social platforms will automatically update once the website is updated by using the Application Programming Interface (API) provided by Facebook and Twitter.

Facebook and Twitter also have their own plugins that integrate with one another so that if information on one platform is updated, it will also update the other automatically.

Metrics

Google Analytics will help to show which platform users are linking from, how they explore the website and how visitor experiences can be enhanced. With this information, CompanyEC will have an improved return on investment, increase conversions and ultimately make more money on the web.

Tracking Users:

  • Allows for seeing how effective or ineffective the platforms are.
  • Which customer and customer segments are most valuable.
  • Which social media platform visitors are coming from and what they do on the website.
  • Will help to see what users like and dislike by analyzing bounce rate and time on website.
  • Which pages resonate with prospects and lead to conversions.

With using this metrics system we will also be able to get a better understanding of what site content users are most interested in and find out how effective our current content is.

 

Credits

Facebook (2010). Statistics. Retrieved January 29, 2010, from http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics

Ostrow, A. (2009). How many people actually use twitter? Retrieved January 29, 2010, from http://mashable.com/2009/04/28/twitter-active-users/

Cheng, J. (2006). Twitter users are mobile, urban, and engaged online. Retrieved January 29, 2010, from http://arstechnica.com/web/news/2009/02/study-twitter-users-are-mobile-urban-and-engaged-online.ars

Quantcast. (2010). Twitter.com monthly traffic. Retrieved January 29, 2010, from http://www.quantcast.com/twitter.com

Perez, S. (2009). 4 ways companies use twitter for business. Retrieved January 29, 2010, from http://www.readwriteweb.com/enterprise/2009/03/4-ways-companies-use-twitter-for-business.php

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